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You’re fighting the wrong war, Wizkid tells South Africans

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Alist singer and social media personality, Ayodeji Balogun, a.k.a. Wizkid has lent his voice to the ongoing #SayNoToXenophobia hashtag trending on Twittersphere and other social media platforms.

The singer in a series of tweet, not only condemned the xenophobic attacks but pointed out that South Africans are “fighting the wrong war and the wrong people.”

The “Soco” crooner further urged South Africans to educate their kids, youths and all concerned that Africa is one.

READ ALSO: Trevor Noah, Cassper Nyovest, condemn xenophobic attacks on foreigners

Wizkid also retweeted an abhorrent viral video of Bongani Mkongi, the current Deputy Minister of Police in South Africa justifying the attacks on foreigners.

Mkongi in the clip said South Africans cannot surrounder their land to foreigners because they fought for it and will not surrender it. The deputy minister of police also claimed that foreigners have dominated more than 80% of their businesses and properties adding that it is economic sabotage.

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Wizkid tweeted;

“Disheartening to watch these videos from my home! You’re fighting the wrong war, fighting the wrong people. How do we walk around hating each other? Africa is one! We’re all the same people! Pls don’t loose yourself! #SayNoToXenophobia One Love.

“Pls educate yourselves, educate the kids, educate the youth! We’re all humans before anything else! “Humans” !! And most importantly “Africans”

Still, on the xenophobic attacks, rapper Ycee lambasted South African rapper, AKA, for his infamous tweets about the Nigerian national football team defeating Bafana Bafana at the just concluded Nations Cup.

YCee via his twitter handle said “I don’t rate South African men at this point … and I’m not trying to create any form of animosity between us and them (that they don’t already feel against us) It is really sad that In 2019 Xenophobia is what we are still facing and discussing as a problem.

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“There is this subtle dislike that a lot of them (If not all) feel towards Nigerians and no matter how hard they try to hide it .. it eventually jumps out – like when AKA had a full childish grown man tantrum when they lost to Nigeria in the nations cup.

“Worst part of this thing is South Africans (or any other foreign nationals) will never feel unsafe in Nigeria.

“We even treat foreigners better than we treat ourselves, which I believe needs to change. The rest of the world doesn’t respect us Cos we don’t respect ourselves…”

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JUST IN: UCH CMD, Prof Otegbayo, reportedly cured of COVID-19

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After eight days of isolation and treatment, the Chief Medical Director (CMD) of the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Prof. Jesse Otegbayo, has tested negative for COVID-19.

According to The Nation, the Head of Public Relations Unit of the hospital, Mr Toye Akinrinlola, said that the last test on his blood sample has come back negative.

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Akinrinlola said the test result arrived at about 3:45 pm to gladden the heart of family, friends and workers of the institution.

Otegbayo had tested positive to the virus seven days ago.

He said he may have contracted the virus through Board meetings of the hospital held from Monday to Wednesday last week.

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The week-long meetings were suspended on Thursday after some members showed symptoms of COVID-19.

He was among the eight confirmed cases in Oyo State as at Wednesday, April 1.

The Provost of the College of Medicine and his deputy have also tested positive for the virus and have since placed themselves in self-isolation.

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COVID-19: Why Africa urgently needs an Ubuntu Plan BY Dr Victor Oladokun

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  • One virus has disrupted the whole world in a manner never seen before in history

Africa urgently needs a globally coordinated Ubuntu Plan in response to COVID-19, a fiscal stimulus that recognises our shared and connected humanity, as we find ourselves in the midst of an unprecedented crisis.

The world’s largest cities are eerily silent. One virus has disrupted the whole world in a manner never seen before in history.

COVID-19, a term that did not exist in our vocabulary a couple of months ago, has brought virtually everything to a grinding halt. It’s a surreal almost cinematic scene. Except that we are all living through it.

With governments balancing economies and the welfare of their citizens, entire industries and institutional systems find themselves fighting for survival in the midst of mandatory lockdowns. Food supply chains, transportation networks, educational systems, governance and judicial systems are either strained or barely functioning with medical services being the worst hit.

Unlike any other pandemic, COVID-19 will alter the way we live, work, and socialise.  The financial costs and the economic devastation are already of epic proportions. This is why Africa in particular urgently needs an Ubuntu Plan. A globally coordinated fiscal stimulus plan that recognises our shared and connected humanity.

The case for an Ubuntu Plan

This past week, America passed a 2 trillion Dollar stimulus package that will keep markets operational, support Americans out of work, and help reduce Federal Reserve lending rates. It is the largest bailout in the history of the United States. European economies likewise have announced stimulus measures in excess of 1 trillion Euros. Chinese factories are ramping up again, backed by a $344 billion stimulus package.

In contrast, Africa’s economies are already buckling. Global demand for oil and gas and commodity products – the mainstays of Africa’s leading economies – has stalled. Revenues which were already overextended have dried up and small, medium, and large enterprises are at risk of total collapse.

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Last Thursday, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) estimated that the pandemic could reduce the growth of the region’s gross domestic product (GDP) from 3.2% to 1.8% in 2020. On 27th March, The Secretary-General of the UN Antonio Guterres said: “Africa is a continent with very little capacity to respond and I am extremely worried that in those situations, we might have millions of cases with millions of people dying”.

Lockdowns are not equal

Even though the United States, Europe and many parts of Asia are better suited economically and infrastructurally to a lockdown, they are struggling to cope with the burden of this sudden pandemic. A situation that will likely be worsened by the duration and unpredictability of the pandemic.

If these societies are struggling, the impact on Africa is best imagined.

Prior to the crisis, 41% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population lived on less than $1.90 a day which is very little to survive on. Seven out of ten persons (70%) in Africa are in vulnerable and precarious forms of informal employment eking their living on a daily basis. Lockdown, homeworking and teleconferencing is therefore not an option. Family support systems from blue and white-collar workers and the diaspora, are themselves under threat. Job losses will strain these critical informal support systems to breaking points.

In Africa, formal social safety nets rarely exist. Therefore, stockpiling food items for extended periods of isolation is out of consideration. Linked with this, Africa requires vast food supplies to meet the needs of the continent’s poorest who can barely afford a decent meal.

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Recent cyclones, Kenneth and Idai, and a  plague of locusts have already put considerable pressure on immediate food supplies for the continent.

Which is why an Ubuntu Plan is now critical in order to cushion the harsh social and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in Africa. Such a plan would include a fiscal stimulus package, the development of critical infrastructure and support for the continent’s most vulnerable populations.

The fact is that in the 21st century, clean water supplies and access to electricity are the stuff of dreams for millions of Africans. Globally, almost 800 million people are without access to clean water. Of these, 40% live in sub-Saharan Africa.  The simple act of handwashing which the pandemic requires for prevention is still not possible for millions. Linked with this, less than 58% of Africa’s population has access to modern healthcare facilities.

A race against time

Africa and its partners have already been striving hard to tackle the challenge of eradicating poverty with measures such as the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and the African Development Bank’s High5 strategy.

The COVID-19 pandemic, however, shines the spotlight on Africa’s poor healthcare delivery systems and facilities and its vast challenges. Africa has one of the highest population densities in the world. For people living in tens of thousands of informal settlements, the idea of social distancing is inconceivable. Millions of vulnerable low-income people live in cramped communal houses and rooms and in areas that lack basic amenities, especially water and sanitation.

In the short term, to effectively combat COVID-19, we urgently need self-testing kits, personal protective equipment (PPEs), makeshift living spaces and hospitals, recovery units and inexpensive easy-to-operate ventilators.

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The World Health Organisation (WHO) has already issued a ten-point strategy that calls for the creation of corridors on the continent to facilitate emergency deployments and material shipments.  The plan also calls on governments and the private sector to help increase supplies, medical equipment and care, and to strengthen surveillance and public awareness, in order to prevent continent-wide community transmission.

In the short window available, global cooperation is imperative.

The African Union’s Vision Agenda 2063 and action plan states among other things, that “We are part of the global drive through the United Nations and other multilateral organisations to find multi-lateral approaches to humanity’s most pressing concerns including human security and peace, the eradication of poverty, hunger and disease …”

Rethinking the future

In the mid to long term, we must urgently rethink social life, urban and rural planning and our budgetary priorities, if life is to be preserved. We must decongest informal settlements rapidly and in their place develop affordable housing that is suitable for isolation and quarantine, in the event of future pandemics.

There is no better time for a globally coordinated Ubuntu Plan. To stop the global spread of COVID-19 and its global devastation, it must be stopped in Africa. The world must pay attention and lend a helping hand by strengthening global cooperation, now more than ever before.

Ubuntu – The preservation of human dignity, health, lives and wellbeing, demands nothing less.

– Dr Victor Oladokun is the outgoing Director of Communication & External Relations at the African Development Bank Group

 

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Coronavirus: Nigeria disease control agency boss quarantined – Health Minister

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Dr. Osagie Ehanire

The Minister of Health, Dr. Osagie Ehanire, said on Tuesday that the Director-General of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control, Chikwe Ihekweazu, has been quarantined for 14 days.

Ehanire stated this when he appeared before the Senate leadership to provide an update on the activities of his ministry to curb the spread of coronavirus in the country.

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He told the Senate principal officers that Ihekweazu was quarantined because he just returned from China.

He said the standard practice was for anyone coming into Nigeria to be quarantined for 14 days before mingling with other members of the public.

Details later…

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